Toothpaste Ingredients: The 10 Main Ingredients In Toothpaste

Toothpaste Ingredients: The 10 Main Ingredients In Toothpaste

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Ingredients in Toothpaste
©Ruslan Guzov/Shutterstock.com

Sweet Drinks Can Hurt Your HeartAccording to a study published last week, sick cheap drinking sugar-packed drinks can cause problems with your heart.

Here’s what the American Heart Association had to say upon learning about this:

The AHA acknowledges the importance of limiting intake of added sugars, including sugar-sweetened beverages. The association is still evaluating the research to determine which strategies accomplish this best, comparing more punitive strategies like taxation with more positive incentives like subsidies or lowering prices for healthy foods. The AHA will continue to monitor the best available research to more fully understand the connection between taxation policy and consumption trends, and ensure that our public policy positions reflect the best available science. The AHA feels that robust evaluation should be part of any tax measures that are passed and advocates for broader nutrition policy efforts that make healthy foods more affordable and accessible to all consumers and bring food pricing and subsidies in line with federal dietary guidelines and AHA nutrition recommendations.

Did you know that while you are reading this, ampoule there are many different forces acting on your teeth?  I’m guessing that right now your tongue is probably slightly resting on the the back of your lower front teeth and the inside of your lips are resting against your front teeth.  If you took a magic school bus ride into the average person”s mouth, stomach you’d probably find the same thing.

Forces On TeethDid you know that both of these forces along with other forces can affect how your smile looks?  In this article, I will go over some of the forces that act on your teeth and how you can make sure that they don’t negatively affect your smile.

Forces that Constantly Try to Move Your Teeth

As I mentioned above, your lips push your teeth into your mouth while your tongue pushes your teeth out.  They eventually find an equilibrium known as the neutral position.

Normally these forces are good.  For example, these forces help keep your teeth arranged in a symmetrical arch.  These forces can also help push permanent lower front teeth out away from the tongue when the permanent teeth come in behind the baby teeth.

However, if the forces in your own mouth get out of hand, they can push your teeth into abnormal positions.

Tongue Habits

Did you know that the average human swallows more than 2,000 times every day!  If you go ahead and swallow right now, you’ll notice that your tongue pushes against your upper front teeth.  As long as you don’t push excessively on your front teeth, usually everything is fine.

Some people have habits that cause them to hold their tongue between their teeth all the time or to push their tongue out excessively when they swallow.

Lip Habits

The forces that your lips apply to your teeth can become a problem if you develop certain habits.  One such habit is tucking your lower lip behind your upper teeth.  This is especially common in younger children and people who bite your-pharmacies.com their lips when they get nervous.

Frena

The labial frenum has been accused of moving the front two teeth apart after they are perfectly aligned with braces.  For this reason, some people choose to cut away the frenum by getting a frenectomy.

Forces From Your Teeth

Other teeth (or the lack thereof) can move your teeth.  Normally when you bite together, your teeth touch and rest in a certain position.  This position is known as centric occlusion.  Normally, the top teeth oppose the bottom teeth and keep them in check.  However, when you lose a tooth, things get interesting!

When you lose a tooth, the teeth drift to fill the space. The teeth on either side of the lost tooth move, as will the tooth that opposes it. For example, if you lost a lower tooth, the tooth on the upper jaw that normally hits it would start to grow down slightly to fill in the space and the adjacent teeth to the lost tooth would start to lean in towards the empty gap.

Certain habits involving tooth-to-tooth contact, such as clenching or grinding your teeth could also cause movement of your teeth.

Another force that can move your teeth is described in Ten Cate’s Oral Histology textbook.  It talks about the back teeth pushing forward ever so slightly against each other, which causes a gradual forward movement of your teeth as you get older.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are many different forces that are constantly acting on your teeth that could cause them to move.  In addition to these internal forces from your own body, teeth can also move due to external forces such as braces, pipe smoking, or musical instruments.  I will discuss these forces in more detail in a future article.

Do you have any questions, comments, or concerns about tooth movement caused by these forces?  I’d love to hear what you have to say in the comments section below.  Thanks for reading!
Vitamins Necessary for Oral Health
• In US today, viagra sale significant Vitamin Deficiencies are not very common.
• Who has vitamin deficiencies?
o People w/ malabsorption syndromes
o Eating Disorders
o “Fad Dieters”
o Alcoholics
• Vitamin A
o Vision, try but also important in the role of tissue growth and differentiation
o Sources: Organ Meats (especially liver) or body can synthesize it from beta carotene which is abundant in many red and yellow vegetables
• Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)
o Coenzyme for several metabolic reactions
o Thought to maintain the proper functioning of neurons
o Sources: Many animal and vegetable food sources
• Vitamin B3 (Niacin)
o Coenzyme for oxidation reduction reactions
o Sources: Animal sources like lean meat and liver, link milk, eggs, wjhole grains, peanuts, yeast, and cereal bran or germ
• Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)
o Serves as a cofactor associated with enzymes that participate in amino acid synthesis
o Sources: found in many animal and vegetable food sources.
• Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)
o Necessary for the proper synthesis of collagen
o Sources: fruits, vegetables, particularly abundant in citrus fruits
• Vitamin D
o Now considered to be a hormone
o Can be synthesized in adequate amounts within the epidermis if the skin is exposed to a moderate degree of sunlight.
o Most milk and processed cereal is fortified with vitamin D in the US today.
o Appropriate levels of Vitamin D and its active metabolites are necessary for calcium absorption from the gut.
• Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)
o Fat soluble vitamin widely stored throughout the body
o Probably functions as an antioxidant
o Vegetable oils, meats, nuts, cereal grains, and fresh greens and vegetables are good sources of vitamin E.
• Vitamin K
o Fat soluble vitamin found in a wide variety of green vegetables, as well as milk, butter, and liver. Intestinal bacteria also produce it.
o Necessary for proper synthesis of various proteins, including clotting factors II, VII, IX, and X.

Vitamin P – Flavanoids or Bioflavanoids the oral health bible recommends this one and says that it helps in the formation of collagen.
Vitamins Necessary for Oral Health
• In US today, page significant Vitamin Deficiencies are not very common.
• Who has vitamin deficiencies?
o People w/ malabsorption syndromes
o Eating Disorders
o “Fad Dieters”
o Alcoholics
• Vitamin A
o Vision, diagnosis but also important in the role of tissue growth and differentiation
o Sources: Organ Meats (especially liver) or body can synthesize it from beta carotene which is abundant in many red and yellow vegetables
• Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)
o Coenzyme for several metabolic reactions
o Thought to maintain the proper functioning of neurons
o Sources: Many animal and vegetable food sources
• Vitamin B3 (Niacin)
o Coenzyme for oxidation reduction reactions
o Sources: Animal sources like lean meat and liver, milk, eggs, wjhole grains, peanuts, yeast, and cereal bran or germ
• Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)
o Serves as a cofactor associated with enzymes that participate in amino acid synthesis
o Sources: found in many animal and vegetable food sources.
• Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)
o Necessary for the proper synthesis of collagen
o Sources: fruits, vegetables, particularly abundant in citrus fruits
• Vitamin D
o Now considered to be a hormone
o Can be synthesized in adequate amounts within the epidermis if the skin is exposed to a moderate degree of sunlight.
o Most milk and processed cereal is fortified with vitamin D in the US today.
o Appropriate levels of Vitamin D and its active metabolites are necessary for calcium absorption from the gut.
• Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol)
o Fat soluble vitamin widely stored throughout the body
o Probably functions as an antioxidant
o Vegetable oils, meats, nuts, cereal grains, and fresh greens and vegetables are good sources of vitamin E.
• Vitamin K
o Fat soluble vitamin found in a wide variety of green vegetables, as well as milk, butter, and liver. Intestinal bacteria also produce it.
o Necessary for proper synthesis of various proteins, including clotting factors II, VII, IX, and X.

Vitamin P – Flavanoids or Bioflavanoids the oral health bible recommends this one and says that it helps in the formation of collagen.
Ever since antifreeze chemicals were discovered in toothpaste produced in China several years ago, information pills people have been increasingly concerned about the ingredients found in toothpaste.  Luckily, viagra anti-freeze is not found in toothpaste sold in the United States as it is illegal.

Toothpaste consists of several different ingredients that leave our teeth feeling fresh and clean.

So if you’ve ever wanted to know what’s inside that gooey paste that you smear against your teeth everyday, remedy read on.

Toothpaste on a Toothbrush

The Ten Main Ingredients In Your Toothpaste

1 – Fluoride

Fluoride is the only active ingredient found in all toothpastes.  It wasn’t until about 50 years ago that fluoride was first added to toothpastes.  Fluoride only makes up about 0.15% of most toothpastes, although prescription-strength fluoride toothpastes contain more than 1% of fluoride.

To learn why fluoride is so important, read about the three ways fluoride protects your teeth.

2 – Abrasives

The abrasives found in toothpastes are what help scrape the plaque off of our teeth.  I think it’s important to mention that many whitening toothpastes contain too many abrasives, which can wear down the enamel or cementum on your teeth and cause your teeth to be sensitive.

Read this article to learn why whitening toothpaste isn’t making your teeth any whiter.

Some examples of abrasives in toothpastes are mica, calcium carbonate, calcium pyrophosphate, dicalcium phosphate, sodium bicarbonate, and hydrated silica.  The mineral mica not only acts as an abrasive, but can add an exciting glitter effect to toothpaste, making the urge to brush almost irresistible!

3 – Detergents

Detergents make people feel like the toothpaste is working by creating bubbles and making the toothpaste foamy.  The main detergent in toothpaste is known as sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS.)  Some researchers believe that sodium lauryl sulfate causes canker sores, but that’s a topic I’ll discuss in a future article.

4 – Flavors

Flavors are added to most toothpastes.  Some common flavors are bubblegum, fruit, mint, and cinnamon.  The purpose of the flavors are to mask any unpleasant tastes in the toothpaste and they can also help to freshen your breath by masking the bad odors in your mouth.

5 – Moisturizers and Humectants

A humectant is something that keeps a substance moist.  Humectants in toothpaste are what keep the toothpaste nice and smooth and help keep it from drying out.  Some commonly-used humectants are glycerin, sorbitol, and water.

Toothpaste Ingredients

6 – Antibacterial Agents

Certain toothpastes contain Triclosan, which is an antibacterial and antifungal agent.  It is commonly found in antibacterial soaps.  Not too long ago, Colgate started adding it to its toothpaste to create the Colgate Total brand that claims to protect teeth from plaque for up to 12 hours.

7 – Preservatives

Preservatives are added to toothpastes so that microbes don’t grow in the toothpaste and spoil it.  It would probably be frustrating if you had to refrigerate your toothpaste — especially if you have teeth that are sensitive to cold temperatures!  Thanks to preservatives, toothpaste is safe for many months at room temperature.

8 – Colors

Colors can give toothpaste an attractive appearance.  When I was a teenager, I remember my mom had bought some “natural” toothpaste.  Being a toothpaste junkie, I decided to try it just for fun to see how it worked.  It was a dark brown color and looked pretty gross and tasted even worse.  I never used that toothpaste again.  A little bit of color could have gone a long way in improving that toothpaste!

9 – Sweeteners

Toothpastes usually contain a substance to make them taste sweet so that we enjoy brushing.  Most toothpastes contain saccharin, aspartame, or xylitol to add a bit of sweetness.

10 – Thickeners

In case the toothpaste is too runny, manufacturers can add ingredients that thicken the toothpaste to form a nice, smooth consistency.  Carageenan and xanthan gum are common thickeners added to toothpastes.

Bonus Ingredients

Those are the main ingredients in toothpaste.  However, some special formulations of toothpaste can include other ingredients such as the ones listed below:

Conclusion

Toothpaste requires many ingredients to work the way it does and to have the appearance and taste that it does.  The ingredients I have listed are those common to toothpaste sold in the United States, however international brands may vary.  If you know of any ingredients I missed or have any questions or comments, I’d love to hear about them below.

Thanks for reading!

9 COMMENTS

  1. Another really interesting and helpful article, Tom! Just curious – are there any concerns with the use of the types of sweeteners you’ve listed, or is the thought that since you rinse it off and no one should swallow toothpaste, it’s all okay?

    • Thanks for the compliment, Pamela!

      I think that the only concern I’ve ever heard of with regards to the sweeteners was about saccharin. In the book Healthy Teeth for Kids, it talks about how saccharin is bad, but the FDA has approved saccharin for human consumption after banning it in the past.

      In any case, I don’t think there’s a problem since you end up spitting it out anyways. I haven’t heard of any problems that came from saccharin ingestion due to eating toothpaste.

      As for xylitol, that is found in a lot of sugar-free chewing gums and has been shown to improve oral health by fighting against the bacteria in our mouths.

      I hope that helps – thanks for your comment!

  2. I never knew all of that was in the toothpaste that I use everyday! You have me on pins and needles wondering about the link between sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and canker sores. I hope that article comes out soon!

    • Hi Benny D – It is interesting that toothpaste has become much more refined than it used to be. Some ingredients used hundreds of years ago were oyster shells, burnt bread, chalk, and powdered brick.

      An article about the various “causes” of canker sores will be coming out soon, don’t worry. Thanks for your comment!

  3. What are you thoughts on the use of Triclosan in toothpaste? From everything I’ve read, the addition of Triclosan to so many everyday products is bad news because of bacterial resistance, as well as the fact that there could be potential health risks from having this chemical flowing through our bloodstream on a daily basis. Is Triclosan in toothpaste just a marketing ploy? Would brushing one’s teeth with regular toothpaste after each meal be just as effective?

    • Hey Rachel – I have also read a lot about Triclosan use in many home care products. Wikipedia does a good job summarizing some of the main concerns with Triclosan.

      On the other hand, I do think that triclosan is effective at reducing the number of bacteria on your teeth after you brush. Colgate has stated that there are 70 clinical studies that uphold the safety and effectiveness of Colgate Total. They even state that “these studies showed no findings that would link triclosan in Total to an adverse effect on the endocrine system.”

      Overall, I do think that triclosan is good – but too much of it (which we may be getting now) may end up causing resistance problems that we will have to face in the future.

      Thanks for your comment, Rachel!

  4. Hi Tom,
    I am pretty sure you are aware of home-made “Natural” toothpaste. I would like to know your opinion about it. I have tried baking soda +conut (1:1) for a months or two. I loved the idea to use less chemical, it left me with a clean feel, my gum seemed healthier, but… Can cause sensitivity for cold or hot? Is it harsh or gentle for the enamel in long term use?

  5. Hi Tom
    Im an Australian mum with a son with intolerance to sorbitol and xylitol and manitol and every other”ol” that is fed into toothpaste.
    I understand why they are there but from my perspective and millions of other IBS sufferes it would be refreshing if the people in the know would market for everyone…not just the unaffected.
    Thank you for your insight.
    We’re having a debate on flouride and its importance ….could you enlighten us
    Kind regards
    Jacquelyn.

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