Tags Posts tagged with "Teething"

Teething

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Teething Baby Pictures
©Sokolova Maryna/Shutterstock.com

One of the most frequently read articles on Oral Answers over the past year is an article that I wrote back in January called What A Baby’s Gums Look Like While Teething.

Teething BabyThat article only showed pictures of the two lower teeth coming in.  I figured that it would also be helpful to show what the upper two teeth look like while coming in.

Also, since all babies are different, I figured it might be helpful to see pictures of a different teething baby.

Melissa, an avid photographer, did an excellent job of documenting her son’s teething experience.

Her son Logan is now four years old and has all of his baby teeth.  Melissa generously allowed me to use her photos in this article to show what his teeth looked like as they came through his gums and how he made it through the teething stage.

How A Baby’s Teeth Look As They Cut Through The Gums

Here’s a picture of Logan’s two upper front teeth as they came poking through the gums:Teething Teeth Poking Through Gums

Here’s a slightly different angle of the same picture:

Teething: Teeth Cutting Through Gums

Here’s a photo of Logan 8 days after the two above pictures were taken:

Teething Teeth Through Gums

Melissa says that Logan’s teething lasted about one week per set of teeth that came in (teeth usually come into the mouth in pairs.)

How to Help Your Baby Survive Teething

There are many things that you can do to help your baby survive the teething process — I don’t mean survive literally, as modern science has shown that babies don’t die from teething!

Melissa states the following about how she helped Logan make it through his difficult teething experience:

“Since he did have one set come in right after another, it was hard to tell when he wasn’t teething minus the spike of a fever right before his teeth would come in. We constantly kept a bib on him to help soak up the drool. He had eczema and the drool made it worse, so I used a clear diaper rash ointment down his chin, neck and chest to protect that area and treat and prevent the rash from getting worse. Logan liked small, plastic, water filled teething rings that you put in the refrigerator. He also liked cold, wet wash cloths to chew on. Apples helped for some of his teeth, but he didn’t like them every time. We tried Orajel, but he didn’t really like it that much. It did seem to help when he would let us get it in there.

Hyland's Teething TabletsMostly, he liked chewing on our fingers. It could hurt us, but at a certain point you will do anything to give your little one some relief. Baby Tylenol for the fevers and night time pain helped once in a while, but if you have a baby who is constantly teething, like Logan, you can’t exactly keep them hopped up on Tylenol. Hyland’s has a teething pill that is natural that really helped Logan and I highly recommend. I also nursed Logan until he was 12 months old, and I think that helped. He never bit me, but it seemed to sooth him somehow.”

Here’s a link to the Hyland’s Teething Tablets that Melissa mentioned.  They seem to have pretty good reviews on Amazon – I wish I’d known about them with our first child!

Here’s a few photos that show Logan easing his teething pain with plastic teething rings, a toy he ripped off his bouncer, and an apple:

Teething Habits

Just as a comparison, here’s two photos that show Logan teething as a baby, then again as a toddler.  It seems like he didn’t mind it as much once he got a little big older.

Teething as a Baby and Toddler

You and Your Baby Will Make It Through Teething

I remember when our oldest son was teething for the first time, my wife and I had no idea what to do.  He was extremely irritable.  At the time, I was going to school full time and my wife was working full time.  We were both exhausted and I vividly remember one night we were both up with our son and my wife ran out to go get some Orajel (which we’ve since learned more about).

Those days are far behind us and we now have a couple of kids with full sets of teeth.  In retrospect, teething was just one small part of their infancy.  Although it was uncomfortable for them at the time, it really is just a distant memory now.

Near the end of her email to me, Melissa said:

“Time has a way of making you forget some of the little parts of their childhood.

Teething will be over before you know it, and you and your baby will both make it through just fine!

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns about teething, feel free to leave a comment below.  Thanks for reading!

Baby Teething Symptoms
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In a paper presented over 100 years ago (1896) at a meeting of the American medical Association, Dr. S.W. Foster said the following about teething:

“The [teething] child becomes wakeful, restless, and fretful, refuses nourishment; the alimentary canal becomes more active, diarrhea follows, and if relief is not given, relaxation of the vital forces follows, and we have nausea, vomiting, confulsions, paralysis, and not infrequently, death.” (Source)

Fortunately, modern medicine has come a long way since the late 1800’s and we now know a lot more about teething.

Want to know what symptoms teething does cause?  Learn about ten real teething symptoms.

10 Symptoms that Teething Doesn’t Cause

False Teething Symptoms1 – Congestion

2 – Diarrhea

3 – Rashes that aren’t on the face

4 – A high fever (teething can cause a minor fever)

5 – Nausea

6 – Convulsions

7 – Paralysis

8 – Vomiting

9 – Sicknesses such as croup and primary herpetic gingivostomatitis

10 – Death

Although it can be argued that death isn’t a “symptom”, but I thought I would add it to the list since many years ago it was a very common belief that teething caused death because so many deaths occurred around the teething ages.  These deaths were likely caused by sicknesses.

Find Out the Real Cause of the Symptom

A study that examined 125 children’s teething symptoms concluded the following:

“We discovered no evidence that teething was associated with any severe, health-threatening conditions. Thus, before attributing any signs or symptoms of a potentially serious illness to teething, physicians and parents must rule out other possible causes. Additional prospective studies may help determine whether occasionally individuals experience signs and symptoms in association with tooth eruption not described in our article.”

If it appears that teething is making your baby sick then you should try to figure out the real cause of the problem.

Do you have a question, comment, or story to share about teething symptoms in your baby?  Go ahead and leave a comment in the comments section below.  Thanks for reading!

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Natal Teeth: Teeth in Newborns
Natal Teeth: Teeth in Newborns | ©Langstrup/Shutterstock.com

Many hundreds of years ago, babies that were born with teeth would be tragically put to death because they were thought to be demons.

Fortunately, that doesn’t occur today.  In fact, parents may be happy to find that their child is born with some teeth because it means that their baby has to experience teething for two less teeth.  Although the mother may not be too happy to have to breastfeed a baby that already hast teeth!

Natal Teeth: Newborns with Teeth

Teeth that are present in a newborn’s mouth are called natal teeth.  Neonatal teeth, on the other hand, are teeth that come into your baby’s mouth in the first 30 days of life.  Sometimes natal teeth can be supernumerary, or extra teeth, but most of the time they are just regular baby teeth that have come in six months early.

What Causes Natal Teeth?

While the exact cause is not known, it is believed that the tooth simply develops in an abnormal position that is much closer to the surface of the gums.

A recent paper, a review of natal teeth says, “The exact [cause of natal teeth] is not known. Infection, febrile states, trauma, malnutrition, superficial position of the tooth germ, hormonal stimulation and maternal exposure to environmental toxins have been implicated as causative factors.”

How Common are Natal Teeth?

I looked at a variety of sources while researching before writing this article.  Some sources say that natal teeth occur in 1 in 6,000 births.  Other sources stated that the number was around 1 in 2,700.  All of those statistics simply came from reports that existed regarding births. However, when a group of researchers actually looked at 7,155 infants looking specifically for natal teeth, they found that 10 of them had natal teeth.  That gives us a prevalence of 1 in 716 births.

The real number is probably somewhere in the range of those three statistics.

2% of infants with unilateral cleft lip and palate are born with natal teeth and 10% of infants with bilateral cleft lip and palate have natal teeth.   Natal teeth are more common in females and children of certain American Indian tribes.

Certain cysts that form on the gums of babies, such as gingival cysts of the newborn and Bohn’s nodules may look similar to natal teeth, but it is important to know that unless the white thing your seeing is as hard as a tooth, it’s probably not a tooth.

Where Do Natal Teeth Occur?

85% of all natal teeth are lower central incisors, 11% are upper incisors, 3% are lower canines and molars, while 1% of natal teeth are upper canines and molars.

What Should You Do If Your Baby Is Born With Teeth?

Many parents are surprised to find that their baby already has teeth and wonder if they need to do anything.

Many times, parents don’t need to do anything.  They can simply relish the fact that they don’t have to go through the teething process for the natal teeth!

It’s not all roses though,there are a few different problems that can occur as a result of natal teeth.  I’ve listed them below with an explanation of what to do about them.

1 – Natal Teeth Can Cause Problems with Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding may be difficult and you may have to pump or mix formula and give it to your baby in a bottle.

McDonald & Avery’s Pediatric Dentistry textbook states, “A retained natal or neonatal tooth may cause difficulty for a mother who wishes to breast-feed her infant. If breast-feeding is too painful for the mother initially, the use of a breast pump and bottling of the milk are recommended. However, the infant may be conditioned not to “bite” during suckling in a relatively short time if the mother persists with breast-feeding. It seems that the infant senses the mother’s discomfort and learns to avoid causing it.”

2 – Natal Teeth Can Cause Ulcers on the Underside of the Tongue

Sometimes the natal tooth will be sharp and can cause an ulcer to form on the underside of the tongue.  This problem is known as Riga-Fede Syndrome.  In this case, the dentist can smooth off the sharp edge of the natal tooth or add a small amount of white filling material to smooth out the tooth.  Once the sharp edge of the tooth is gone, the ulcer usually resolves.

3 – Natal Teeth May Pose a Choking Hazard

While many natal teeth are fixed firmly into the jawbone, sometimes natal teeth are very loose.  In cases where natal teeth are very loose, some sources say that it is a good idea to have the natal teeth extracted.  Other sources say that there are no documented cases of a child choking on a natal tooth and that extracting it can be an emotionally difficult procedure for the parents.

I think that the most important thing to find out here is whether or not the natal tooth or teeth are extra teeth.  Dr. Pinkham’s pediatric dentistry textbook says that all extra (supernumerary) natal teeth should be extracted, while regular baby teeth that are natal teeth should be evaluated to see if they pose a choking hazard to the infant.

Conclusion

Natal teeth may occur more often than once per every thousand births.  They may not cause any problems, but they can cause ulcers on the infant’s tongue and problems with breastfeeding.  They can cause difficulty if they are loose as they may pose a choking hazard for the baby.

Do you have any questions about what to do when your baby is born with teeth?  Did your child have natal teeth?  Please share your comments, experiences, and questions in the comments section below.  Thanks for reading!

Baby Teething Gel and Methemoglobinemia
©Jandrie Lombard/Shutterstock.com

Imagine waking up in the middle of the night to an upset teething baby.  You stick some Orajel in the baby’s mouth and go back to bed for some sleep.  The next morning, you realize that your baby isn’t breathing.  Although rare, this can happen.

Teething BabyLast month, the FDA spoke out about a certain complication known as methemoglobinemia that can occur with Orajel and other popular baby teething gels on the market.

Methemoglobinemia occurs when hemoglobin (the protein in blood that carries oxygen) gets modified so that it can’t carry oxygen to the body as effectively.  Because we all need oxygen to survive, methemoglobinemia is a potentially fatal disease.

Any teething gel that contains benzocaine can cause methemoglobinemia.  This includes such brands as:

The complication that can occur with baby teething gels is due to the local anesthetic, benzocaine, which teething gels use to cause a numbing sensation in your teething baby’s gums.

In their warning, the FDA states: “Methemoglobinemia has been reported with all strengths of benzocaine gels and liquids, including concentrations as low as 7.5%. The cases occurred mainly in children aged two years or younger who were treated with benzocaine gel for teething.”

In case you’re wondering, the strength of benzocaine in Orajel Baby teething gel is 7.5%.  Here’s the Drug Facts label for Baby Orajel if you’d like to take a look.

Symptoms of Methemoglobinemia

If you’ve used a lot of teething gel on your teething baby, it’s important to look for the following symptoms, which can be a sign of methemoglobinemia:

  • Pale, grayish-blue skin, lips, and finger/toe nail beds.
  • Shortness of breath
  • Tiredness and fatigue
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Confusion
  • Headache
  • Lightheadedness

If you believe that your baby has methemoglobinemia, it is important to seek medical care immediately.

How to Prevent Your Teething Baby From Getting Methemoglobinemia

The best way to prevent your teething baby from getting methemogloginemia would be to simply not use teething gels.  The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry says that you can simply massage your baby’s gums or give them a chilled teething ring.

Looking for more ways to calm your teething baby without using Orajel?  Check out the article, Eight Natural Teething Remedies to Help Your Teething Baby.

Conclusion

If you want more information about Methemoglobinemia and teething gels, you can check out this news release from the American Dental Association.

It is important to remember that any drug that you give your child can have serious side effects.  Make sure that you are an informed parent by learning about each drug you give your child – not just teething gels!

Do you have any questions, comments, or concerns about methemoglobinemia and teething gels?  I’d love to hear what you have to say in the comments section below.  Thanks for reading!

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Natural Teething Remedies
©Lucky Business/Shutterstock.com

Many parents aren’t comfortable giving their little teething babies teething gel, especially when they hear about the rare, but serious side effects that can occur. Back before teething gels were invented, many parents used natural methods to calm their teething babies. Fortunately, for those parents that don’t want to give their teething babies drugs, there are many natural teething remedies to choose from. The teething baby boy pictured to the left would be a great little spokesman for the natural teething baby association as he happily soothes his aching gums with a carrot. While I do list some natural teething remedies below, it’s pretty likely that I passed over some good ones.  If you know of a good, natural teething remedy that I didn’t mention, please write about it in the comments section below.

Eight Natural Teething Remedies to Help Your Teething Baby

1 – Teething Biscuits.  Many parents love using teething biscuits to calm their teething babies.  Be sure to choose a teething biscuit that is healthy for your little one.  When used in moderation, teething biscuits shouldn’t adversely affect your little one’s oral health.

Want to learn more about teething biscuits?  Read Teething Biscuits: A Natural Way to Calm Your Teething Baby.

2 – Frozen Teething Rings. Cold items such as teething rings can alleviate the pain that a teething baby experiences.

Using a Carrot to Calm a Teething Baby3 -Frozen Carrots & Bananas. Frozen bananas are a sweet treat that can ease your baby’s sore gums.  If your baby chews on a frozen carrot, only small bits of carrot come off at a time.  Some parents don’t want to give their children frozen objects because they don’t want to inadvertently freeze their baby’s gums by giving them something so cold.  If you want to play it safe, just go with a cold carrot, as pictured above.

Important – Any time you give your baby something to eat, you must stay with them at all times to help prevent choking.

4 – A small, cold metal spoon. You can either keep some spoons in the refrigerator, or put a small metal spoon in a glass of ice water.  Your teething baby can then hold the spoon and bite down on it to help soothe their irritated gums.

5 – A cold, damp washcloth. Some parents have found that their baby enjoys chewing on a frozen damp washcloth or a cold, wet washcloth.

6 – Dried Fruit. Many parents advocate the use of dried apples to help ease teething troubles.  Any dried fruit that allows the child to chew can help alleviate teething problems.  Keep in mind that you should use dried fruit in moderation, as it can cause tooth decay.

Want to know which of the six kinds of fruit are bad for your child’s teeth?  Read Is Fruit Good or Bad For Your Teeth?  It Depends.

7 – Ice chips in a clean baby sock. Some parents have found that by putting small ice chips in a baby sock, and then tying off the sock, they can give their baby something cold without the risk of their baby’s gums getting too cold.

8 – Gently rub your baby’s gums with your finger.  I’ve tried this with my children and it seemed to help them, although my daughter has bit me before!  It didn’t hurt too much however due to the lack of teeth.  Holding your baby and massaging their gums with your finger can also provide comfort to your teething baby during this hard time.

Beware of Possibly Dangerous Natural Teething Remedies

The internet is an interesting place.  Almost anybody can say anything about any topic under the sun.  It is important to know that although teething does cause some irritation in your child, it’s probably a good idea to not use any unproven homeopathic remedies. Dr. Steven Pray, a professor at the College of Pharmacy at Southwestern Oklahoma State University has said, “Parents or caregivers should be cautioned against use of unproven and potentially dangerous teething remedies such as homeopathic teething tablets containing belladonna, coffee, magnets, tea tree oil, anise seed, clove oil, and cantharides.” Use your common sense when dealing with your teething baby.  Many parents simply look for a quick fix to their baby’s teething troubles, possibly putting their precious baby at risk.

What Do You Do to Help Your Teething Baby?

Do you have any other suggestions to help the parents that are reading this post be able to more effectively calm their teething baby?  Do you have any questions, comments, or concerns? I’d love to hear what you have to say in the comments section below – Thanks for reading!

Teething Biscuits Natural Teething Remedy
©Dave Clark Digital Photo/Shutterstock.com

Many parents are looking for a way to help soothe their teething baby that doesn’t involve smearing a numbing gel such as Orajel on their gums.  Teething biscuits are just one of many alternatives and have been around for quite some time.

Does Your Teething Baby Need Teething Biscuits?

Baby Teething BiscuitThe short answer to this question is no.  Your baby does not need teething biscuits.  Certain babies may not be ready for solid foods such as teething biscuits.  As a parent, you know your baby better than anyone else and can probably make the best decision as to whether or not teething biscuits are right for your child.  Here are a few advantages to teething biscuits:

1 – Teething biscuits can soothe your baby’s gums and satisfy the urge that your child has to bite during teething (one of the 10 symptoms of a teething baby)

2 – Teething biscuits help your child learn to feed him or herself.

3 – Teething biscuits can provide valuable nutrition to your child that may be difficult to obtain while the child is teething.

My wife and I gave teething biscuits to our daughter during her teething episodes.  We found that some of them made a mess, but overall they helped ease our daughter’s teething troubles.

Where to Buy Teething Biscuits

Baby Mum Mum Rice Rusks Teething BiscuitsYou can find teething biscuits at pretty much any grocery store or at an online retailer such as Amazon.  A few popular types to consider are:

Make Your Own Teething Biscuits

If you’d rather not pay retail prices, it may be cheaper to make your own teething biscuits at home, not to mention that you’ll know exactly what you are feeding your baby.

WholesomeBabyFood.com has this page with some good teething biscuit recipes and it tells you what ingredients are safe to use for your baby.

Conclusion

Teething biscuits certainly aren’t the only natural way to help your teething baby.  In my next teething article I’ll go into detail about the many other natural ways to help pacify your teething child.

I also want to add a caution that any solid objects near your child’s mouth do pose a choking risk so you should always supervise them if you decide to give them teething biscuits.

Have you ever given teething biscuits to your teething child?  Do you have any questions, comments, or stories to share about teething?  I’d love to hear what you have to say in the comments section below.  Thanks for reading!

Does Teething Cause a Fever in Teething Babies?
©Sokolova Maryna/Shutterstock.com

There are so many symptoms that are attributed to teething that many parents think that they’re child is almost always teething!  Traditionally, “academic research” has found that teething doesn’t really cause a fever, while many parents and caregivers that are actually taking care of teething babies report that they definitely do get fevers during teething.

Where does the truth lie?  Do teething babies really get fevers?  I decided to find out.

Does Teething Cause a Fever?

Does Teething Cause a Fever?This is a tricky question and in order to answer it, we need to define exactly what a fever is.  If we define a fever as a temperature above 102º, then the answer is usually pretty clear that teething does not cause a major fever over 102 degrees.

But, when we define a fever as a smaller temperature rise, say a temperature of 100º for example, the answer is not so clear-cut.

A study that appeared in the journal Pediatrics followed 494 different tooth eruptions.  They found that “mild temperature elevation” was associated with teething, but a high fever of 102º degrees and above was not associated with teething.

Another study followed 46 healthy infants while they were teething.  20 of them had a fever within a few days of cutting their first tooth while only 7 of them had a fever a couple of weeks before their first tooth poked through their gums.  Although it would appear from these results that teething is associated with a fever, they had some cautionary advice:

From the data presented here it would seem that the ‘granny’s tale’ that infants cut their teeth with fever is supported. We would like to stress the danger in attributing fever to teething without ruling out other pathology. Children are teething from about 6 months to 6 years and therefore can easily be found to be teething when ill from other causes. Only the eruption of the first tooth is a clear landmark and so this study limited itself to the period before its emergence. We are intrigued by our finding and have no explanation to offer at this stage for the observation.

We were taught as students to listen to parents; grandma seems also to have had something to tell us.

From the two studies above, it may appear that teething does cause a mild fever in some children.

The last study I would like to share followed 90 different tooth eruptions. They analyzed the data in many different ways, but in the end they couldn’t find an association between fevers and teething:

A possible association between teething and fever was investigated in several ways…A graph of mean z score temperatures for the 28 days either side of an eruption day showed no trends toward raised or rising temperature near eruption days. Two separate logistic regression analyses adjusting for age were performed to examine possible associations between toothday status and fever. In the first, high fever was compared with no fever, whereas in the second low fever score was compared with no fever.  Neither analysis indicated a relationship between tooth eruption and fever.

The last study failed to find any association between fevers and teething.

Conclusion – Does Teething Cause Fevers?

The few studies that we do have on this subject give us mixed answers.  There are a few things that we can say for sure:

1 – Children get lots of fevers.  It could be that the fevers that they get around the time that they are teething are simply by coincidence.

2 – If your child is sick while teething, don’t just assume that it is due to the teething.  It’s always best to get a definitive answer from a doctor.

3 – Teething doesn’t cause fevers, but some teething babies may experience a slight rise in temperature around the time when they are teething.

I hope that answers some of your questions about teething and fevers.  If you have any questions, comments, or teething stories to share, feel free to leave them below in the comments section.  Thanks for reading!

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How Long Does Teething Last?
©Olga Vladimirova/Shutterstock.com

If you’ve had a child, then you probably know how teething affects kids — and parents!

When it comes to teething, many parents want to know at what age teething starts and how long it will last.  While I can’t give you an exact answer as to when your child will start teething and for how long, I can point out some general guidelines.

The Age When Babies Start Teething

The average baby’s first tooth pokes through their gums right around the age of six to ten months.  Since all baby’s get their first tooth at a different age, it may help to give a general outline of when to expect all 20 of your baby’s teeth.  I mostly used the data from the ADA’s Primary Tooth Eruption Chart (PDF) and have put the average age in months when each event occurs (shown in parentheses) below as well.

Around  4 to 10 months your baby will get their first teeth, the lower front two teeth, the lower central incisors.  (~8 months)

Two months later the two upper front teeth (central incisors) will come into your baby’s mouth. (~10 months)

One month later, the upper lateral incisors will come in. (~11 months)

Two months later, the lower lateral incisors will come in. (~13 months)

Three months later, your baby’s first molars will come in on the top and on the bottom. (~16 months)

Three months after that, your baby will get the upper canine teeth. (~19 months)

One month later, your baby will get the lower canine teeth. (20 months)

Seven months later, your baby will get their lower second molars. (27 months)

Two months later, your baby will complete their baby teeth by getting their upper second molars. (29 months)

Age Babies Start Teething

As you can see, your baby will constantly be getting new teeth over the course of about two years.  It’s important to understand that while your child will keep getting new teeth during this time, they won’t be teething the entire time.  Teething refers to the process by which a tooth erupts through the gums into the mouth.  This process can include some pain and discomfort, usually during the period of time before you actually see the tooth emerge from the gum.

Now that you know when to expect all 20 of your baby’s teeth, let’s discuss teething in greater detail.

How Long Does Teething Last?

In the late 1990’s, a survey was sent out to many parents asking them about various aspects of their children’s teething habits.  One question that I noticed in particular asked the parents how long their babies had teething symptoms for each tooth that came into their mouth.  Aside from a few parents that said their children didn’t experience any teething symptoms (I wish I could say that!), here’s what the rest had to say about how long teething lasted for their kids:

How Long Does Teething Last?

As you can see, the results are all over the place.

If you do a quick search on the internet, you come up with many interesting stories, some of which claim that teething takes over 6 months!  Take a quick look at the following comment that user chrellis_26 said on the BabyCenter website:

“My son started the teething process at about three and a half months, he was ten months old when he finally got one tooth. Lately, now at fifteen months, it can take days or weeks of irritable behavior before a tooth comes in.”

I think the reason that there are so many differing opinions on this issue is because many people attribute fevers and other unexplained irritable behavior to teething.  For example, some people believe that teething can cause a high fever and diarrhea – both of which are teething myths (stay tuned for a teething myths article in the future!)

The real process of teething can cause some inflammation in the gum tissue as the tooth pokes through.  Personally, I believe that teething would normally last from about 1-7 days per tooth.  Several months of teething pain seems a bit far-fetched.  The only authoritative quote I could find on this subject comes from the book Paediatric Dentistry, edited by Richard Welbury.  It states:

“Inflammation of the gingival tissues before complete emergence of the crown may cause a temporary painful condition that subsides within a few days.”

Sometimes babies can get multiple teeth at the same time, so it may seem like teething is taking forever, especially when you’re waking up at all hours of the night to comfort your little bundle of teething joy.

Conclusion

To sum it up, teething will be occurring over and over from a week or so before your baby gets their first tooth and until a week or so before your child gets their last baby tooth — right around the age of 2 ½.

Do you have any questions about teething or any experiences to share?  I’d love to hear about them in the comments section below.  Thanks for reading!

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Teething: How a Baby's Gums Look While Teething
©Sergey Novikov/Shutterstock.com

A few years ago, my wife and I kept thinking that our son was getting his first tooth.  He eventually got it, but there were many times when it looked like his first tooth would be coming in and it didn’t.  It’s important to know that the first tooth usually comes in around six months of age.

Since a baby’s first tooth is often anxiously awaited by parents and often takes longer than expected to poke through, I decided to post a couple of photos of a young baby that were taken before and after his first tooth came in — just five days apart.  This will show you what you might see if a tooth is close to making its debut!

Teething: Baby's First Tooth

The photo on the left was taken five days before the photo on the right.  In the photo on the left, you can see that there is a little bump on the gums where the lower tooth will come in.  In the photo on the right, you can see that the tooth finally poked through into the baby’s mouth.

What a Baby’s Gums Look Like When They Are Teething

Here’s a close-up of the image on the left.  You can clearly see that the gums are raised up slightly where the new tooth will be coming in.

Teething Baby's Gums

What a Baby’s First Tooth Looks Like

Here’s a close-up of the image on the right, that shows the baby’s tooth finally poking up through the gums:

Teething Baby's First Tooth

Take a look at Teething Baby Pictures to see more pictures of baby teeth coming in.

Conclusion

It’s important to keep in mind that the appearance of the gums isn’t the only indication that your baby’s first tooth is about to poke through.  Here are some other signs and symptoms of a teething baby.

If you have any questions or comments regarding your teething child, feel free to leave them in the comments section below.  Thanks for reading!