16 Delicious Snacks That Your Teeth Will Like

16 Delicious Snacks That Your Teeth Will Like

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Foods that are Good for Your Teeth
©Bajinda/Shutterstock.com

It seems that dentists and dental hygienists have a bad reputation for naming off a bunch of foods that aren’t very good for your teeth.

Well… to get rid of that reputation, I’ve decided to do the opposite.  Here’s a list of 16 snacks that you’ll enjoy almost as much as your teeth will:

List of Foods that Are Good for Your Teeth

Fruit Can Be Good for Your Teeth1 – Whole Wheat Bread – The rise of processed starchy foods over the past few decades has no doubt caused many cavities.  White bread with added sugar seems to now be a staple in many homes.  Rather than reaching for something with lots of added sugar to get your carbohydrates, try some whole wheat bread – your teeth and your body will thank you.  My wife makes this whole wheat bread recipe – it tastes pretty good, too.

2 – Fresh Vegetables – Celery, Carrots, Radishes, Cucumbers, Broccoli, and the list could go on!   Fibrous foods, like vegetables are able to stimulate the salivary glands to release lots of saliva, which in turn protects the teeth.  Vegetables also don’t have as much sugar as fruits.  An easy way to that we have found to add vegetables to our diet is by mixing some together in a salad.  Our favorite is cucumber tomato salad.

Watermelon Helps Clean Your Teeth As You Eat It!3 – Fresh Fruit – Yes, fruit does have sugar, but it also provides valuable nutrients for the body.  Fresh fruit is a great choice because it is also fibrous, which makes it takes longer to chew, which releases more saliva which helps your teeth.  This makes it a good match for a healthy mouth in spite of the sugars it contains.  Canned fruit is also good, just make sure that it’s not soaking in a sugary syrup.  If it has added sugar, it might be doing more harm than good.

For more info on fruit and oral health, read the article Is Fruit Good or Bad for Your Teeth?

4 – Plain Yogurt with Fruit – Most of the brands of yogurt at the store seem to think that when you add fruit to pure yogurt, you need to add a few teaspoons of sugar to make it taste good.  Try making your own fruit-flavored yogurt by adding fruit to plain yogurt.

5 – Cottage Cheese with Fresh Peaches or Pears – I’ll be honest.  This used to gross me out just thinking about it…  It may not sound too appetizing to you, either.  But, I have to say that after trying it, it’s a pretty good snack.  Try it — you might just like it, but maybe not as much as your teeth will.

Cheese Neutralizes Acids and Provides Valuable Nutrients For Your Teeth6 – Cheese – Cheese is great for your teeth since it contains calcium, and phosphates.  It also neutralizes harmful acid created by the plaque in your mouth.  There are even little snack-sized 100 calorie packs of delicious cheese that you can take with you wherever you go!

7 – Soups – Chicken soups in the winter warm you up and make your teeth happy! A warning –  Be careful with certain soups such as stews and tomato soups that contain lots of sugar.

Popcorn is Great for Your Teeth!8 – Nuts -Nuts are a great source of nutrition that won’t harm your teeth.  Peanuts are a great choice.  Watch out for peanut butter, as it can contain a lot of added sugar.  Just make sure that you don’t crack the shells with your teeth!

9 – Popcorn – Popcorn is a great food for snacking on.  It beats out all of the other snacks such as potato chips and cheese puffs because it’s not made of refined starch.  Just be sure to floss after you eat it or your dental hygienist may find some popcorn remains in your mouth at your next checkup.  It happened to me when I was a teenager.  She asked me if I’d had popcorn recently.  I said, “I think so.”  That turned out to be the right answer.

Cows Can Help Our Teeth
Cows give us milk and cheese. Both help our teeth.

10 – Milk – Cow’s milk has three key substances: calcium, phosphorus, and casein.  All of those are believed to prevent cavities.  Many different studies have even shown that after drinking milk, the bacteria on your teeth don’t really do any harm to your teeth.  Here’s one such study, and another one.

11 – Hard Boiled Eggs – They are extremely portable and even come in a natural hard package.  Mix things up and make it a deviled egg – just don’t add sugar.

12 – Meats such as turkey and chicken.  Better yet, add it to some whole wheat bread and make a sandwich that will delight your incisors.  Some processed lunch meats can contain a lot of added sugar, so be careful when shopping.

Sunflower Seeds Are Great for Your Teeth!13 – Seeds like pumpkin and sunflower seeds.  Make your own when you carve pumpkins this Halloween or buy some at the store.  If you buy seeds pre-packaged, just check out the ingredients first to ensure that they aren’t sugar-laden.

14 – Smoothies made from milk, fresh fruit, and/or yogurt – This is a great treat that does have some sugar in it, but it’s much better to get your sugar from milk and fresh fruit than it is to get it from sticky candy such as caramel, jelly beans, sour patch kids, or toffee.

Trident Gum Contains Xylitol - Good for Your Teeth!15 – Sugar-free chewing gum – Sugar-free chewing gum is a great way to promote salivary flow in your mouth.  Saliva can washes away food, neutralizes acid in the mouth, and can repair damaged teeth.  If you can’t brush after you eat, try chewing a piece of gum.  Some gums, such as this Trident gum contain xylitol, which is a sugar-alcohol that can actually kill the bacteria that ruin your teeth.

16 – Sugar-free candy – Sugar-free candy also promotes salivary flow in the mouth.  Sucking on sugar-free candy is much better than bathing all of your teeth in a hard-candy sugar bath for 15-20 minutes at a time.

What Other Tooth-Friendly Foods Can You Think Of?

I’m sure I missed some.  Are there any snacks that you like to eat that don’t hurt your teeth?  Let us all know about them in the comments section below!

4 COMMENTS

  1. HI Tom,

    On the subject of sugar-free chewing gum…I live in Canada and have seen Trident XtraCare Chewing Gum that claims to rebuild/strengthen enamal. Does not contain xylotol, rather but Recaldent(a milk derivative). There’s a warning on the label that says not to take if you are allergic to milk products, and there are some “medicinal ingredients” on the label.

    From the Trident website:
    “Recaldent is a unique form of calcium for teeth. Its casein complexes remain in the plaque layer for up to 3 hours after chewing, leaving a ready pool of calcium and phosphate ions. It increases tooth remineralization over and above that due to saliva stimulation from regular sugar free gum.”

    Any thoughts/opinions on this?
    Thanks
    T

    • Hi T – I used to chew that gum everyday back when I was doing my undergraduate work and worked at a Texaco gas station (They gave us a few dollars in store credit since we didn’t get lunch breaks and I just ended up using it all in free gum.)

      Basically, the enamel in our teeth is made up of crystals that are composed of phosphate, calcium, and either hydroxide or fluoride ions. When we eat sugar, the bacteria on our teeth dissolve some of these enamel crystals. Luckily our teeth can repair it once the sugar is rinsed away. In order to repair it, our teeth will need extra phosphate, calcium, and hydroxide/fluoride ions. Our saliva has a certain amount of those ions, but the Trident chewing gum gives us some extra calcium and phosphate to help speed up the repair process and stick around in the mouth to help out the next time you eat.

      Recaldent has been shown to promote remineralization of the tooth, here’s a study that demonstrates this. However, there’s other studies that show that it may not be as good as other materials for promoting remineralization – here’s one of those.

      All in all, I would say that any sugar-free chewing gum is good for your teeth and will aid in remineralization. The Trident with Recaldent might be better than chewing gum without it. I say if you like it, go for it!

      By the way, if you haven’t read the article Keep Your Teeth Below Freezing, it talks a lot about the process of remineralization.

      I hope that helps, let me know if you have any other questions, T. Thanks for your comments!

      • http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/search/label/dental%20health

        hello Tom, I read that grains r not so good for your dental health, cn u read this article n give ur thought about it

        Diet number 3 was the most effective……. Here’s how it was described in the paper (note: cereals = grains):
        …instead of cereals- for example, bread, oatmeal, rice, and tapioca- an increased allowance of potatoes and other vegetables, milk, fat, meat, and eggs was given. The total sugar, jam, and syrup intake was the same as before. Vitamin D was present in abundance in either cod-liver oil or irradiated ergosterol, and in egg yolk, butter, milk, etc. The diet of these children was thus rich in those factors, especially vitamin D and calcium, which experimental evidence has shown to assist calcification, and was devoid of those factors- namely, cereals- which interfere with the process.

        n what about u, what kind of diet do u practice. I am from Malaysia and my staple diet is mainly rice n I want to go on low carb not not sure where cn I get my source of energy . any thoughts on that ?

        tq have a nice day

  2. I thought I was going to get some great suggestions here…and you’re promoting eating animals’ bodies and their breast milk/discharge…all stuff that rots teeth and is not good for us (and definitely not good for the victims who die for it). Also, you reference nuts…some nuts are very, very acidic and will create cavities, and you have to properly soak them before eating them. How could you miss that? Were you too busy promoting acidic dairy and acidic meats to notice?

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