Colored Fillings

Colored Fillings

Colored Dental Tooth Fillings
©Kukshinov/Shutterstock.com

“Your child has a cavity.”

Not many parents want to hear those words, especially if their child has dental anxiety.

Last summer, I saw a three year old child who needed to have a filling on one of his upper molars.

Green Colored FillingThe only reason he sat still in the chair long enough for us to remove the decay and get a filling put in was because we told him we were going to give him a yellow colored filling.

He loved tractors, and wanted it to be yellow like his toy tractor. When he was all done, we took a picture of it and gave it to him so he could show his friends and family.

I’ve found that giving children a colored filling (along with some other things we do to make the comfortable), helps them to sit in the dental chair and get their needed dental work completed.

Find out why baby teeth need to have fillings if they just fall out.

Colored Fillings

Pink Colored FillingColored fillings are made of the same composite materials as tooth-colored fillings, they simply have more exciting coloring added to them.

At our office, we have five colors to choose from: blue, green, yellow, orange, and pink.

To the right, you can see how the pink filling looks on a tooth – it’s what most of the girls end up choosing.  That filling, as well as the green one above, was placed to fill in a cavity that formed between the teeth, which is one of the more common places you can get a cavity.

While we can do a colored filling to repair most cavities in baby teeth, nobody has had us do one on a front tooth yet!

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9 COMMENTS

  1. Using colored fillings is a nice idea. Children do love colors and somehow eliminates the fear of sitting on the chair. Thanks for this nice post!

    Doug Horstman
    President, Encompasse Tours
    FACES Ski
    “Come to the 26th Annual FACES Conference, for Dental CME”

  2. Colored restorations for children is a nice way to make them feel good about restorations and can say it is a dental tattoo, on the other hand in adults it dosent sound to be very popular.

  3. Thank you so much Dr Tom! The info u provided was a life-saver for me…. my almost 7yo has shark teeth and I freaked out untili read ur info. Thanks for relieving my anxiety!

  4. They do not color the contents. Metal contents are completely out of gray besides mercury. So, that’s why they are overused highlighted. You can become projection highlighted fillings, but they price additional.

  5. There’s a downside to this – as much as the colours help children who are anxious about restoration, they are also pretty and can easily become a status symbol among kindergarteners and primary school children. A dentist’s assistant I spoke to said that glittery “princess teeth” are the goal of many small girls, and there seem to be parents who think this is cute and encourage their daughters to get them. How? By not brushing.
    At my son’s kindergarten, two boys (brothers) had a full set of gold teeth in front. My son doesn’t want the boring natural teeth, but the glittery ones or the gold ones. He knows that to get artificial teeth he needs cavities, so he refuses to brush.
    I can’t see the end to this battle yet, and I almost wish for the bad old days when a trip to the dentist gave you nightmares… at least we brushed out of fear.

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